Broken Ankle

During the past 30 years, doctors have noted an increase in the number and severity of broken ankles, due in part to an active, older population of baby boomers. The ankle actually involves two joints, one on top of the other. A broken ankle can involve one or more bones, as well as injury to the surrounding connecting tissues (ligaments).

Anatomy of the Ankle 

The top ankle joint is composed of three bones:

  • The shinbone (tibia)
  • The other bone of the lower leg (fibula)
  • The anklebone (talus)

The leg bones form a scooped pocket around the top of the anklebone. This lets the foot bend up and down.

Right below the ankle joint is another joint (subtalar), where the anklebone connects to the heel bone (calcaneus). This joint enables the foot to rock from side to side.

Three sets of fibrous tissues connect the bones and provide stability to both joints. The knobby bumps you can feel on either side of your ankle are the very ends of the lower leg bones. The bump on the outside of the ankle (lateral malleolus) is part of the fibula; the smaller bump on the inside of the ankle (medial malleolus) is part of the shinbone.

When a Break Occurs

Any one of the three bones that make up the ankle joint can break as the result of a fall, an automobile accident or some other trauma to the ankle.

Because a severe sprain can often mask the symptoms of a broken ankle, every injury to the ankle should be examined by a physician. Symptoms of a broken ankle include:

  • Immediate and severe pain
  • Swelling
  • Bruising
  • Tender to the touch
  • Inability to put any weight on the injured foot
  • Deformity, particularly if there is a dislocation as well as a fracture

A broken ankle may also involve damage to the ligaments. Your physician will order X-rays to find the exact location of the break. Sometimes, a CT (computed tomography) scan or a bone scan will also be needed.

For broken ankle treatment options, please visit our Foot and Ankle Center.

 

*Source:  American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society® http://www.aofas.org

*This material was codeveloped by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons

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